lakes and rivers

Seabased photo of the sea

SEABASED helped to improve the status of marine area by reducing nutrients from the seabed

Eutrophication is one of the most large-scale problems of the Baltic Sea. While the nutrient load from land-based sources has been cut significantly during past decades, nutrients that are stored in the seabed and are being released from the sediment back to the waterbody.  
 
Reduction of nutrients, hazardous substances and toxins inflow into the Baltic

Heawater improved water quality in selected small urban rivers

The project Heawater improved water quality in selected small urban rivers by preventing nutrients and hazardous substances inflow from watersheds to Baltic Sea.

Partners from Estonia, Sweden and Finland developed and tested new technological solutions that were specially designed for small rivers to reduce pollution load. The most suitable solution for each selected small river was tested as part of the pilot investments that were carried out in Tallinn, Söderhamn and Turku. Monitoring data shows reduction in concentration of selected indicators more than 10%.

Reduction of nutrients, hazardous substances and toxins inflow into the Baltic

NUTRINFLOW: Sustainable and approachable nutrient reduction

NUTRINFLOW reduced nutrient losses from agriculture to immediate watersheds and into the Baltic Sea. Reduction was achieved through pilot investments implemented in Finland, Sweden and Latvia, where various nutrient sources were targeted. Instead of the planned five nutrient sources, the project ended up choosing 11 sources. Actions included river channel restorations, building wetlands and flood plains, mounting or renovating culverts and improving subsurface drainage. Direct improvements from these actions were reduced nutrient losses in phosphorus and nitrogen.

Reduction of nutrients, hazardous substances and toxins inflow into the Baltic
INSURE roll-up final conference

INSURE - New methods to prevent hazardous substances from reaching the Baltic Sea

The project “Innovative Sustainable Remediation” (INSURE), with project partners from Sweden, Latvia and Finland, aimed to improve and increase the rate of remediation of contaminated sites and thereby decreasing the hazardous substances and toxins into the Baltic Sea. Currently the most common treatment for contaminated areas is excavation, where contaminated masses are removed and transported away for treatment or final storage. This not is considered sustainable because of the CO2 emissions created to transport both clean and contaminated masses.

Reduction of nutrients, hazardous substances and toxins inflow into the Baltic